Research article Topical Sections

The effect of guardians' health literacy on the child's spending time at home: A cross-sectional study among Japanese schoolchildren

  • Received: 02 August 2022 Revised: 16 January 2023 Accepted: 18 January 2023 Published: 08 February 2023
  • Background

    The contents of children's daily activities and the amount of time spent on them has been directly linked to their health and development. Parental health behavior has also been considered a key factor, and the aim of this study was to determine the relationship between parent/guardian health literacy (HL) and their child's time spent at home by behavioral types. The study was conducted in elementary schools in Japan.

    Method

    The target subjects for this study were elementary schoolchildren (all grades, aged 6 to 12 years) and their parents/guardians, and almost 3000 schoolchildren and their parents/guardians in the Northern and Southern districts in Japan participated. The questionnaire for parents/guardians included amount of time spent per day on the seven major behavioral contents of their child's time at home, on weekdays and weekends, respectively, and a shortened five-item health literacy (HL) scale. Parent/guardian HL results were categorized into two groups (low HL group and high HL group), and we analyzed the association between the HL and child's time spent at home by behavioral contents.

    Results

    Children in the high HL parent/guardian group spent significantly less time watching TV and playing games than those in the low HL group, both on weekdays and weekends. Time spent playing outside on weekdays and on hobbies on weekdays and weekends was significantly longer for children in the high HL parent/guardian group than in the low HL group. Results of logistic regression analyses adjusted for confounders showed that higher parental/guardian HL reduced children's spending more than 30 minutes watching TV or playing games and increased children's spending more than 30 minutes on outside playing and doing hobbies.

    Conclusions

    Parental/guardian HL affected the child's time spent at home. The results could suggest that increasing parental/guardian HL has strong potential to improve children's major lifestyle behaviors.

    Citation: Yuki Sato, Reiko Suzuki, Michiko Shigihara, Chieko Suzuki. The effect of guardians' health literacy on the child's spending time at home: A cross-sectional study among Japanese schoolchildren[J]. AIMS Public Health, 2023, 10(1): 52-62. doi: 10.3934/publichealth.2023005

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  • Background

    The contents of children's daily activities and the amount of time spent on them has been directly linked to their health and development. Parental health behavior has also been considered a key factor, and the aim of this study was to determine the relationship between parent/guardian health literacy (HL) and their child's time spent at home by behavioral types. The study was conducted in elementary schools in Japan.

    Method

    The target subjects for this study were elementary schoolchildren (all grades, aged 6 to 12 years) and their parents/guardians, and almost 3000 schoolchildren and their parents/guardians in the Northern and Southern districts in Japan participated. The questionnaire for parents/guardians included amount of time spent per day on the seven major behavioral contents of their child's time at home, on weekdays and weekends, respectively, and a shortened five-item health literacy (HL) scale. Parent/guardian HL results were categorized into two groups (low HL group and high HL group), and we analyzed the association between the HL and child's time spent at home by behavioral contents.

    Results

    Children in the high HL parent/guardian group spent significantly less time watching TV and playing games than those in the low HL group, both on weekdays and weekends. Time spent playing outside on weekdays and on hobbies on weekdays and weekends was significantly longer for children in the high HL parent/guardian group than in the low HL group. Results of logistic regression analyses adjusted for confounders showed that higher parental/guardian HL reduced children's spending more than 30 minutes watching TV or playing games and increased children's spending more than 30 minutes on outside playing and doing hobbies.

    Conclusions

    Parental/guardian HL affected the child's time spent at home. The results could suggest that increasing parental/guardian HL has strong potential to improve children's major lifestyle behaviors.



    加载中

    Acknowledgments



    The authors thank to all participants, the education committee, the participating schools and research assistants.

    Conflict of interest



    All authors declare no conflicts of interest in this paper.

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