Research article

Development, characterization and shelf-life testing of a novel pulse-based snack bar

  • Received: 19 April 2019 Accepted: 16 July 2019 Published: 22 August 2019
  • With the globalization of food trade, we are observing tremendous changes in eating patterns of youngsters. Snack bars represent convenient, appropriately portioned, Ready-To-Eat food items, which not only supply nutrients to the body but also provide a feeling of satiety. The aim of this study was to formulate a novel high-protein, low Glycemic Index and low-fat snack bar that can be eaten on-the-move. Twelve different pulse-based bar formulations were developed and 85.1% of sensory panelists indicated that they particularly liked the taste of formulation M1. Since M1 contained peanuts, a nut-free and date-free equivalent (mM1) was developed to cater for individuals with allergies to these ingredients. A dehydrated mix (DM) based on the mM1 composition, was also developed. The microbiological and sensorial shelf lives of the products were then determined during storage at either ambient (ca. 23 ℃) or refrigerated temperatures (ca. 4 ℃) by determining counts of aerobic bacteria and yeast and mold. Mean aerobic bacteria and yeast and mold counts of M1 fell in the range of 8.4–9.4 and 4.5–5.4 log cfu/g and 7.5–8.6 and 3.8–4.9 log cfu/g during storage at room and refrigerated temperatures respectively. Aerobic bacteria and yeast and mold counts were consistently higher under ambient storage. Since a microbial population density >7 Log CFU/g usually marks the onset of microbiological spoilage, the bars were estimated to have a microbiological shelf-life of <2 days. Overall this study points to the development of a tasty and nutritious pulse-based Ready-To-Eat snack as well as a dehydrated mix that can be readily reconstituted at home or at work.

    Citation: Tina Bhakha, Brinda Ramasawmy, Zaynab Toorabally, Hudaa Neetoo. Development, characterization and shelf-life testing of a novel pulse-based snack bar[J]. AIMS Agriculture and Food, 2019, 4(3): 756-777. doi: 10.3934/agrfood.2019.3.756

    Related Papers:

  • With the globalization of food trade, we are observing tremendous changes in eating patterns of youngsters. Snack bars represent convenient, appropriately portioned, Ready-To-Eat food items, which not only supply nutrients to the body but also provide a feeling of satiety. The aim of this study was to formulate a novel high-protein, low Glycemic Index and low-fat snack bar that can be eaten on-the-move. Twelve different pulse-based bar formulations were developed and 85.1% of sensory panelists indicated that they particularly liked the taste of formulation M1. Since M1 contained peanuts, a nut-free and date-free equivalent (mM1) was developed to cater for individuals with allergies to these ingredients. A dehydrated mix (DM) based on the mM1 composition, was also developed. The microbiological and sensorial shelf lives of the products were then determined during storage at either ambient (ca. 23 ℃) or refrigerated temperatures (ca. 4 ℃) by determining counts of aerobic bacteria and yeast and mold. Mean aerobic bacteria and yeast and mold counts of M1 fell in the range of 8.4–9.4 and 4.5–5.4 log cfu/g and 7.5–8.6 and 3.8–4.9 log cfu/g during storage at room and refrigerated temperatures respectively. Aerobic bacteria and yeast and mold counts were consistently higher under ambient storage. Since a microbial population density >7 Log CFU/g usually marks the onset of microbiological spoilage, the bars were estimated to have a microbiological shelf-life of <2 days. Overall this study points to the development of a tasty and nutritious pulse-based Ready-To-Eat snack as well as a dehydrated mix that can be readily reconstituted at home or at work.


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