Research article Special Issues

Emotional intelligence protects nurses against quiet quitting, turnover intention, and job burnout

  • Received: 04 March 2024 Revised: 08 April 2024 Accepted: 15 April 2024 Published: 25 April 2024
  • Background 

    Emotional intelligence can improve nurses' interpersonal and coping skills, job performance, and resilience. However, there is a dearth in the literature on whether emotional intelligence affects levels of quiet quitting, turnover intention, and job burnout in nurses.

    Objective 

    We examined the relationship between emotional intelligence, quiet quitting, turnover intention, and job burnout.

    Methods 

    We conducted a cross-sectional study in Greece with a convenience sample of 992 nurses. We used the following valid tools to measure our study variables: the Trait Emotional Intelligence Questionnaire-Short Form, the Quiet Quitting Scale, and the single item burnout measure.

    Results 

    The mean age of our nurses was 42.2 years. After controlling for gender, age, work experience, shift work, and understaffed department, the multivariable linear regression models indicated significant negative relationships between emotional intelligence and quiet quitting, turnover intention, and job burnout. Specifically, self-control reduced detachment, lack of motivation, job burnout, and turnover intention. Moreover, emotionality reduced detachment, lack of motivation, and lack of initiative. Sociability reduced lack of initiative and lack of motivation, while well-being reduced lack of motivation, job burnout, and turnover intention.

    Conclusion 

    Emotional intelligence reduced quiet quitting, turnover intention, and job burnout in nurses. Therefore, nurse managers and policy-makers should apply interventions to optimize the emotional intelligence profiles of nurses.

    Citation: Petros Galanis, Aglaia Katsiroumpa, Ioannis Moisoglou, Maria Kalogeropoulou, Parisis Gallos, Irene Vraka. Emotional intelligence protects nurses against quiet quitting, turnover intention, and job burnout[J]. AIMS Public Health, 2024, 11(2): 601-613. doi: 10.3934/publichealth.2024030

    Related Papers:

  • Background

    Emotional intelligence can improve nurses' interpersonal and coping skills, job performance, and resilience. However, there is a dearth in the literature on whether emotional intelligence affects levels of quiet quitting, turnover intention, and job burnout in nurses.

    Objective

    We examined the relationship between emotional intelligence, quiet quitting, turnover intention, and job burnout.

    Methods

    We conducted a cross-sectional study in Greece with a convenience sample of 992 nurses. We used the following valid tools to measure our study variables: the Trait Emotional Intelligence Questionnaire-Short Form, the Quiet Quitting Scale, and the single item burnout measure.

    Results

    The mean age of our nurses was 42.2 years. After controlling for gender, age, work experience, shift work, and understaffed department, the multivariable linear regression models indicated significant negative relationships between emotional intelligence and quiet quitting, turnover intention, and job burnout. Specifically, self-control reduced detachment, lack of motivation, job burnout, and turnover intention. Moreover, emotionality reduced detachment, lack of motivation, and lack of initiative. Sociability reduced lack of initiative and lack of motivation, while well-being reduced lack of motivation, job burnout, and turnover intention.

    Conclusion

    Emotional intelligence reduced quiet quitting, turnover intention, and job burnout in nurses. Therefore, nurse managers and policy-makers should apply interventions to optimize the emotional intelligence profiles of nurses.



    加载中

    Acknowledgments



    This study was not funded by any agency and was conducted by the authors independently.

    Conflict of interest



    Petros Galanis is an editorial board member for AIMS Public Health and was not involved in the editorial review or the decision to publish this article. All authors declare that there are no competing interests.

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