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Vitamin D status and disability among patients with multiple sclerosis: a systematic review and meta-analysis

Running title: Vitamin D status and MS disability
  • Received: 08 November 2020 Accepted: 29 January 2021 Published: 05 February 2021
  • Association between the serum vitamin D level and disability of patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) has been investigated during several researches. However, these studies reported different results. The current study aims to estimate the correlation between the concentrations of 25 (OH) vitamin D and the level of disability among MS patients. Using Mesh and non-Mesh terms related to MS, disability level and vitamin D, different data banks were searched. Required information was extracted from the selected eligible primary articles. Stata version 11 software was applied for combining the primary correlation coefficients using random effect model. The effect of MS type and patients' age was assessed using meta-regression models. Sensitivity analysis was performed to investigate the role of each primary study in the pooled estimate. Egger test was applied to find any publication bias. Of 14 eligible studies, the total correlation coefficient (95% confidence interval) between 25 (OH) vitamin D level and disability in both sexes as well as among female was estimated as of −0.29 (−0.40, −0.17) and −0.35 (−0.46, −0.24) respectively. Two articles carried out among male did not report significant results. Our meta-analysis showed a significant negative correlation between 25 (OH) vitamin D level and disability of MS patients so that the disability reduces with increasing the 25 (OH) vitamin D level.

    Citation: Mahmood Moosazadeh, Fatemeh Nabinezhad-Male, Mahdi Afshari, Mohammad Mehdi Nasehi, Mohammad Shabani, Motahareh Kheradmand, Iraj Aghaei. Vitamin D status and disability among patients with multiple sclerosis: a systematic review and meta-analysis[J]. AIMS Neuroscience, 2021, 8(2): 239-253. doi: 10.3934/Neuroscience.2021013

    Related Papers:

  • Association between the serum vitamin D level and disability of patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) has been investigated during several researches. However, these studies reported different results. The current study aims to estimate the correlation between the concentrations of 25 (OH) vitamin D and the level of disability among MS patients. Using Mesh and non-Mesh terms related to MS, disability level and vitamin D, different data banks were searched. Required information was extracted from the selected eligible primary articles. Stata version 11 software was applied for combining the primary correlation coefficients using random effect model. The effect of MS type and patients' age was assessed using meta-regression models. Sensitivity analysis was performed to investigate the role of each primary study in the pooled estimate. Egger test was applied to find any publication bias. Of 14 eligible studies, the total correlation coefficient (95% confidence interval) between 25 (OH) vitamin D level and disability in both sexes as well as among female was estimated as of −0.29 (−0.40, −0.17) and −0.35 (−0.46, −0.24) respectively. Two articles carried out among male did not report significant results. Our meta-analysis showed a significant negative correlation between 25 (OH) vitamin D level and disability of MS patients so that the disability reduces with increasing the 25 (OH) vitamin D level.


    Abbreviations

    MS

    Multiple Sclerosis

    EDSS

    Expanded Disability Status Scale

    NOS

    New-Castle-Ottawa Scale

    DBP

    Vitamin D Binding Protein

    PRMS

    Progressive Relapsing Multiple Sclerosis

    SRMS

    Secondary Relapsing Multiple Sclerosis

    加载中


    Availability of supporting data



    The datasets used and/or analyzed during the current study are available from the corresponding author on reasonable request.

    Author contributions



    MM, MS, MA and MMN conceived and designed the study protocol. FN, MM, IA, MA and MK screened all the references, extracted the data, and wrote the paper. MMN and IA served as arbitrator in case of discrepancies during extraction and wrote the paper. All authors read and approved the final draft.

    Conflict of interests



    The authors declare no conflict of interest.

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