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Halophilic microorganism resources and their applications in industrial and environmental biotechnology

1 Department of Microbiology, Faculty of Science, Chulalongkorn University, Patumwan, Bangkok 10330, Thailand
2 Graduate School of Environmental and Human Sciences, Meijo University, Tenpaku-ku, Nagoya 468-8502, Japan
3 Research Institute of Meijo University, Nagoya 468-8502, Japan

Topical Section: Halophilic microorganisms resources and its application in industrial and environmental biotechnology

Hypersaline environments are extreme habitats on the planet and have a diverse microbial population formed by halophilic microorganisms. They are considered to be actual or potential sources for discovery bioactive compounds, compatible solutes including novel and/or extraordinarily enzymes. To date, a number of bioactive compounds for the use in various fields of biotechnology which show assorted biological activities ranging from antioxidant, sunscreen and antibiotic actions have been reported. In addition, some halophilic microorganisms are capable of producing massive amounts of compatible solutes that are useful as stabilizers for biomolecules or stress-protective agents. The present review will impart knowledge and discuss on (i) potential biotechnological applications of bioactive compounds, compatible solutes and some novel hydrolytic enzymes; (ii) recent efforts on discovery and utilization of halophiles for biotechnological interest; (iii) future perspective of aforementioned points.
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