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Saccharomyces pastorianus as cell factory to improve production of fructose 1,6-diphosphate using novel fermentation strategies

Department of Experimental Medicine, Section of Biotechnology, Medical Histology and Molecular Biology, Second University of Naples, L. De Crecchio Street 7, 80138, Naples, Italy

Special Issues: Microbial biotechnology

Enzymatic phosphorylation of glucose with inorganic phosphate, mediated by permeabilized yeast cells, is one of the methods commonly used to manufacture fructose 1,6-diphosphate, a compound of pharmaceutical interest. This process requires high concentrations of yeast active biomass, that is the catalyst of bioconversion of glucose and inorganic phosphate into fructose 1,6-diphosphate. In this study we firstly describe the high cell density production of a brewer's Saccharomyces strain (Saccharomyces pastorianus DSM 6581), focusing on the optimization of medium composition and exploiting fed-batch strategies and novel technologies based on membrane bioreactors. In fed-batch fermentation an appropriate exponential feed profile was set up to maintain the glucose concentration in the bioreactor below 0.9 g·L-1, thus yielding reproducibly 58 g dry weight biomass per liter in 80 h fermentation, improving eight-fold batch processes output. In addition a higher final biomass density was reached when implementing a microfiltration strategy (70 g dry weight biomass), that led to a productivity of 2.1 gcdw·L-1·h-1, 2.4-fold the fed-batch one. Successively, this biomass was opportunely permeabilized and proved capable of catalyzing the bioconversion of glucose into fructose 1,6-diphosphate. Acting on critical parameters of the bioconversion (substrates molar ratio, catalyst concentration and permeabilization agent), fructose 1,6-diphosphate was produced, after 3 h of process, at 56.3 ± 1 g·L-1 with a yield of 80% of the theoretical value.
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