Research article

Downregulation of vimentin intermediate filaments affect human mesenchymal stem cell adhesion and formation of cellular projections

  • Received: 24 August 2020 Accepted: 27 September 2020 Published: 15 October 2020
  • Mesenchymal stem cells hold great promise as a therapeutic cell source for a variety of diseases such as osteoarthritis and degenerative disc disease. Their unique homing ability and multipotentiality play key roles in their applications in medicine. Specifically, hMSCs capability to adhere and migrate to damaged tissue's extracellular matrix is essential for serving their therapeutic purpose. The roles of some cytoskeletal elements, such as actin and microtubules, in cell migration and adhesion have been well described, while that of intermediate filaments (IFs) is not well understood. There is increasing evidence that vimentin IFs also function in cell spreading and adhesion, but their relationships in MSCs have not been fully characterized. In this work, we sought to understand how vimentin IFs govern adhesion and cellular cytoplasmic projection formation in human MSCs. Using shRNA to knockdown vimentin IFs in MSCs, we found that vimentin IFs are necessary for the cellular structural integrity required for cell-substrate adhesion and for forming and maintaining cellular projections.

    Citation: Poonam Sharma, Shalise Burch, Tejasvi Peesay, Susan M. Hamilla, Adam H. Hsieh, Carlos Luna Lopez. Downregulation of vimentin intermediate filaments affect human mesenchymal stem cell adhesion and formation of cellular projections[J]. AIMS Bioengineering, 2020, 7(4): 272-288. doi: 10.3934/bioeng.2020023

    Related Papers:

  • Mesenchymal stem cells hold great promise as a therapeutic cell source for a variety of diseases such as osteoarthritis and degenerative disc disease. Their unique homing ability and multipotentiality play key roles in their applications in medicine. Specifically, hMSCs capability to adhere and migrate to damaged tissue's extracellular matrix is essential for serving their therapeutic purpose. The roles of some cytoskeletal elements, such as actin and microtubules, in cell migration and adhesion have been well described, while that of intermediate filaments (IFs) is not well understood. There is increasing evidence that vimentin IFs also function in cell spreading and adhesion, but their relationships in MSCs have not been fully characterized. In this work, we sought to understand how vimentin IFs govern adhesion and cellular cytoplasmic projection formation in human MSCs. Using shRNA to knockdown vimentin IFs in MSCs, we found that vimentin IFs are necessary for the cellular structural integrity required for cell-substrate adhesion and for forming and maintaining cellular projections.


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    Acknowledgment



    The authors would like to acknowledge the National Science Foundation for funding this work (CBET 0845754, AHH), and Professor Diane Wagner at IUPUI for sharing stem cell expertise in support of the experiments in this study.

    Author contributions



    Poonam Sharma was responsible for experimental procedures and writing the manuscript.
    Shalise Burch was responsible for experimental procedures and writing the discussion part of the manuscript.
    Teju Pessay was responsible for experimental procedures and data acquisition.
    Susan Hamilla was responsible for writing and data analysis.
    Adam Hsieh was responsible for supervision, intellectual content, and data analysis.
    Carlos Luna was responsible for supervision, experimental procedures, and data analysis.

    Conflict of interest



    The authors declare no conflict of interest.

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