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Perceived neighborhood social cohesion and cervical and breast cancer screening utilization among U.S.-born and immigrant women

  • Received: 07 March 2022 Revised: 30 May 2022 Accepted: 27 June 2022 Published: 11 July 2022
  • Research suggests that factors beyond the individual level, such as neighborhood-level factors, warrant further investigation in explaining preventive screening utilization disparities. In addition, research shows that immigrant women, especially recent immigrants, are less likely than U.S.-born women to utilize preventive screenings. Our study examined the relationship between perceived neighborhood social cohesion and breast and cervical cancer screening utilization among U.S.-born and immigrant women. Data came from the 2018 National Health Interview Survey (NHIS). The sample for this study included 7801 women ages 21−64 without a hysterectomy. Of them, 1477 (19%) reported being born outside the United States. Logistic regression was used to examine associations of perceived neighborhood social cohesion and sociodemographic factors with the odds of screening by nativity status. Though we found no link between neighborhood social cohesion and Papanicolaou (Pap) test or mammogram utilization, our findings contribute to understanding sociodemographic barriers to and facilitators of preventive screening utilization among immigrant and U.S.-born women. Most importantly, racial/ethnic and socioeconomic disparities in Pap tests and mammogram utilization were evident among immigrant women. The disparities we identified indicate the need to target prevention messages and tailor interventions to address each group's sociodemographic characteristics and needs. Our findings also support the need to expand health insurance so that all women are covered.

    Citation: Quynh Nhu (Natasha) B. La Frinere-Sandoval, Catherine Cubbin, Diana M. DiNitto. Perceived neighborhood social cohesion and cervical and breast cancer screening utilization among U.S.-born and immigrant women[J]. AIMS Public Health, 2022, 9(3): 559-573. doi: 10.3934/publichealth.2022039

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  • Research suggests that factors beyond the individual level, such as neighborhood-level factors, warrant further investigation in explaining preventive screening utilization disparities. In addition, research shows that immigrant women, especially recent immigrants, are less likely than U.S.-born women to utilize preventive screenings. Our study examined the relationship between perceived neighborhood social cohesion and breast and cervical cancer screening utilization among U.S.-born and immigrant women. Data came from the 2018 National Health Interview Survey (NHIS). The sample for this study included 7801 women ages 21−64 without a hysterectomy. Of them, 1477 (19%) reported being born outside the United States. Logistic regression was used to examine associations of perceived neighborhood social cohesion and sociodemographic factors with the odds of screening by nativity status. Though we found no link between neighborhood social cohesion and Papanicolaou (Pap) test or mammogram utilization, our findings contribute to understanding sociodemographic barriers to and facilitators of preventive screening utilization among immigrant and U.S.-born women. Most importantly, racial/ethnic and socioeconomic disparities in Pap tests and mammogram utilization were evident among immigrant women. The disparities we identified indicate the need to target prevention messages and tailor interventions to address each group's sociodemographic characteristics and needs. Our findings also support the need to expand health insurance so that all women are covered.



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    All authors declare no conflicts of interest.

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