Research article

Nursing staff fatigue and burnout during the COVID-19 pandemic in Greece

  • Received: 29 August 2021 Accepted: 17 November 2021 Published: 23 November 2021
  • Introduction

    The coronavirus pandemic (COVID-19) is an unprecedented global health crisis with emotional and physical impact on health care workers.

    Objective

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the levels of fatigue and burnout in nursing staff during the pandemic.

    Methods

    The present study involved nursing staff from hospitals in Greece in February 2021, who completed the Fatigue (FAS) and Burnout (CBI) questionnaires. Gender, age, years of work experience, workplace (COVID-19 or non-COVID-19 wards) and SARS-CoV-2 infection status were recorded.

    Results

    The sample included 593 women and 108 men, with a mean age ± SD: 42.9 ± 9.9 years and 18.14 ± 10.8 years work experience. Slightly more than half, (367, 52.4%) worked in COVID-19 departments. Fifty-six (8%) tested positive for SARS-CoV-2 and 14 of them needed to be treated. The mean ± SD FAS and CBI scores were 25.6 ± 7.4 and 46.9 ± 18.8, respectively (67.9% and 42.9% had scores suggestive of fatigue and burnout, respectively). Women showed higher values in both scales (p < 0.01). Subjects working in COVID-19 wards scored significantly higher on both the FAS and CBI scales; they were also younger and with less work experience (p < 0.01). Staff treated for COVID-19 scored higher on the burnout scale (p < 0.01) than the uninfected staff. Fatigue showed a strong positive correlation with burnout (p < 0.01, r = 0.70). Stepwise multiple regression showed that the variation of fatigue was explained by 47.0% and 6.1% by the scores on the subscales of personal and work-related burnout, respectively.

    Conclusion

    In conclusion, high rates of fatigue and burnout were found in the studied population. Nurses working with COVID-19 patients had higher rates of fatigue and burnout compared to those working elsewhere. There was a strong positive correlation (r = 0.70) between burnout and fatigue. Particular attention should be paid to staff who became ill and need to be treated.

    Citation: Christos Sikaras, Ioannis Ilias, Athanasios Tselebis, Argyro Pachi, Sofia Zyga, Maria Tsironi, Andrea Paola Rojas Gil, Aspasia Panagiotou. Nursing staff fatigue and burnout during the COVID-19 pandemic in Greece[J]. AIMS Public Health, 2022, 9(1): 94-105. doi: 10.3934/publichealth.2022008

    Related Papers:

  • Introduction

    The coronavirus pandemic (COVID-19) is an unprecedented global health crisis with emotional and physical impact on health care workers.

    Objective

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the levels of fatigue and burnout in nursing staff during the pandemic.

    Methods

    The present study involved nursing staff from hospitals in Greece in February 2021, who completed the Fatigue (FAS) and Burnout (CBI) questionnaires. Gender, age, years of work experience, workplace (COVID-19 or non-COVID-19 wards) and SARS-CoV-2 infection status were recorded.

    Results

    The sample included 593 women and 108 men, with a mean age ± SD: 42.9 ± 9.9 years and 18.14 ± 10.8 years work experience. Slightly more than half, (367, 52.4%) worked in COVID-19 departments. Fifty-six (8%) tested positive for SARS-CoV-2 and 14 of them needed to be treated. The mean ± SD FAS and CBI scores were 25.6 ± 7.4 and 46.9 ± 18.8, respectively (67.9% and 42.9% had scores suggestive of fatigue and burnout, respectively). Women showed higher values in both scales (p < 0.01). Subjects working in COVID-19 wards scored significantly higher on both the FAS and CBI scales; they were also younger and with less work experience (p < 0.01). Staff treated for COVID-19 scored higher on the burnout scale (p < 0.01) than the uninfected staff. Fatigue showed a strong positive correlation with burnout (p < 0.01, r = 0.70). Stepwise multiple regression showed that the variation of fatigue was explained by 47.0% and 6.1% by the scores on the subscales of personal and work-related burnout, respectively.

    Conclusion

    In conclusion, high rates of fatigue and burnout were found in the studied population. Nurses working with COVID-19 patients had higher rates of fatigue and burnout compared to those working elsewhere. There was a strong positive correlation (r = 0.70) between burnout and fatigue. Particular attention should be paid to staff who became ill and need to be treated.



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    Acknowledgments



    We would like to thank all participants in our study.

    Conflict of interest



    All authors declare no conflict of interest.

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