Case report

Shark bite survivors advocate for non-lethal shark mitigation measures in Australia

  • Received: 30 August 2021 Accepted: 17 November 2021 Published: 22 November 2021
  • As the annual number of shark-related human casualties in Australia increases, there is a need for policymakers to grasp how policy is created in the discourse of shark bite incidences. This is discussed in relation to individuals who have been most affected, i.e., shark bite survivors. The defined argument, being that, victims should feel the most animosity towards sharks, therefore if they show signs of discontent towards culling programs, the government should be compelled to change their strategy. The paper reinforces and challenges assumptions that contribute to the flow of commonly accepted knowledge of shark-human relations by illustrating how shark bite survivors are unlikely marine conservation advocates who support non-lethal shark mitigation methods. Shark bite victims were contacted via two Australian-based organizations and a total of six qualitative semi-structured interviews were conducted. Government shark mitigation practices are perceived as heavy handed and further perception- and conservation-based research is needed.

    Citation: Michael J. Rosciszewski-Dodgson, Giuseppe T. Cirella. Shark bite survivors advocate for non-lethal shark mitigation measures in Australia[J]. AIMS Environmental Science, 2021, 8(6): 567-579. doi: 10.3934/environsci.2021036

    Related Papers:

  • As the annual number of shark-related human casualties in Australia increases, there is a need for policymakers to grasp how policy is created in the discourse of shark bite incidences. This is discussed in relation to individuals who have been most affected, i.e., shark bite survivors. The defined argument, being that, victims should feel the most animosity towards sharks, therefore if they show signs of discontent towards culling programs, the government should be compelled to change their strategy. The paper reinforces and challenges assumptions that contribute to the flow of commonly accepted knowledge of shark-human relations by illustrating how shark bite survivors are unlikely marine conservation advocates who support non-lethal shark mitigation methods. Shark bite victims were contacted via two Australian-based organizations and a total of six qualitative semi-structured interviews were conducted. Government shark mitigation practices are perceived as heavy handed and further perception- and conservation-based research is needed.



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