Research article Special Issues

Effects of inter-cavity corrosion on metallic wall ties in masonry structures

  • Received: 09 February 2022 Revised: 07 March 2022 Accepted: 10 March 2022 Published: 22 March 2022
  • An important structural component for cavity brick and masonry-veneer construction are wall ties. Typically, they are galvanized steel, sufficiently strong to provide continuity for transmission of direct and shear forces. However, field observations show they are prone to long-term corrosion and this can have serious structural implications under extreme events such as earthquakes. Opportunistic observations show corrosion occurs largely to the internal masonry interface zone even though conventional Code requirements specify corrosion testing for the whole tie. To throw light on the issue electrochemical test for 2 grades of galvanized ties and 316 stainless steels combined with three different mortar compositions are reported. Most severe corrosion occurred at the masonry interface and sometimes within the masonry itself. Structural capacity tests showed galvanized ties performed better than stainless steel ties in lieu of stainless steel R4 class ties presenting significantly greater relative losses of yield strength, ultimate tensile strength and elongation structural capacity compared to R2 low galvanized and R3 heavy galvanized tie classes.

    Citation: Igor A Chaves, Robert E Melchers, Barbara Jardim do Nascimento, Jordan Philips, Mark Masia. Effects of inter-cavity corrosion on metallic wall ties in masonry structures[J]. AIMS Materials Science, 2022, 9(2): 311-324. doi: 10.3934/matersci.2022019

    Related Papers:

  • An important structural component for cavity brick and masonry-veneer construction are wall ties. Typically, they are galvanized steel, sufficiently strong to provide continuity for transmission of direct and shear forces. However, field observations show they are prone to long-term corrosion and this can have serious structural implications under extreme events such as earthquakes. Opportunistic observations show corrosion occurs largely to the internal masonry interface zone even though conventional Code requirements specify corrosion testing for the whole tie. To throw light on the issue electrochemical test for 2 grades of galvanized ties and 316 stainless steels combined with three different mortar compositions are reported. Most severe corrosion occurred at the masonry interface and sometimes within the masonry itself. Structural capacity tests showed galvanized ties performed better than stainless steel ties in lieu of stainless steel R4 class ties presenting significantly greater relative losses of yield strength, ultimate tensile strength and elongation structural capacity compared to R2 low galvanized and R3 heavy galvanized tie classes.



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