Research article

A mathematical model of oncolytic virotherapy with time delay

  • Received: 16 September 2018 Accepted: 28 January 2019 Published: 06 March 2019
  • Oncolytic virotherapy is an emerging treatment modality which uses replication-competent viruses to destroy cancers without causing harm to normal tissues. By the development of molecular biotechnology, many e ective viruses are adapted or engineered to make them cancer-specific, such as measles, adenovirus, herpes simplex virus and M1 virus. A successful design of virus needs a full understanding about how viral and host parameters influence the tumor load. In this paper, we propose a mathematical model on the oncolytic virotherapy incorporating viral lytic cycle and virus-specific CTL response. Thresholds for viral treatment and virus-specific CTL response are obtained. Di erent protocols are given depending on the thresholds. Our results also support that immune suppressive drug can enhance the oncolytic e ect of virus as reported in recent literature.

    Citation: Zizi Wang, Zhiming Guo, Hal Smith. A mathematical model of oncolytic virotherapy with time delay[J]. Mathematical Biosciences and Engineering, 2019, 16(4): 1836-1860. doi: 10.3934/mbe.2019089

    Related Papers:

  • Oncolytic virotherapy is an emerging treatment modality which uses replication-competent viruses to destroy cancers without causing harm to normal tissues. By the development of molecular biotechnology, many e ective viruses are adapted or engineered to make them cancer-specific, such as measles, adenovirus, herpes simplex virus and M1 virus. A successful design of virus needs a full understanding about how viral and host parameters influence the tumor load. In this paper, we propose a mathematical model on the oncolytic virotherapy incorporating viral lytic cycle and virus-specific CTL response. Thresholds for viral treatment and virus-specific CTL response are obtained. Di erent protocols are given depending on the thresholds. Our results also support that immune suppressive drug can enhance the oncolytic e ect of virus as reported in recent literature.
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    © 2019 the Author(s), licensee AIMS Press. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0)
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