Mathematical Biosciences and Engineering, 2013, 10(5&6): 1351-1363. doi: 10.3934/mbe.2013.10.1351.

Primary: 97B99, 97--03; Secondary: 01A80.

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The mathematical and theoretical biology institute - a model of mentorship through research

1. School of Mathematical & Natural Sciences, Arizona State University, 4701 W. Thunderbird Rd, Glendale, AZ, 85306
2. Mathematics Department, University of Texas at Arlington, Box 19408, Arlington, TX 76019-0408

This article details the history, logistical operations, and design philosophyof the Mathematical and Theoretical Biology Institute (MTBI), a nationallyrecognized research program with an 18-year history of mentoring researchers atevery level from high school through university faculty, increasing the numberof researchers from historically underrepresented minorities, and motivating them to pursue research careers by allowing them to work on problems of interest to them and supporting them in this endeavor. This mosaic profilehighlights how MTBI provides a replicable multi-level model for research mentorship.
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Keywords underrepresented minorities; sequential research experience; Mentoring; mathematical modeling.; research communities

Citation: Erika T. Camacho, Christopher M. Kribs-Zaleta, Stephen Wirkus. The mathematical and theoretical biology institute - a model of mentorship through research. Mathematical Biosciences and Engineering, 2013, 10(5&6): 1351-1363. doi: 10.3934/mbe.2013.10.1351

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This article has been cited by

  • 1. Kelly K. Sturner, Pamela Bishop, Suzanne M. Lenhart, Developing Collaboration Skills in Team Undergraduate Research Experiences, PRIMUS, 2017, 27, 3, 370, 10.1080/10511970.2016.1188432

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Copyright Info: 2013, Erika T. Camacho, et al., licensee AIMS Press. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution Licese (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0)

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