AIMS Bioengineering, 2015, 2(2): 49-59. doi: 10.3934/bioeng.2015.2.49.

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Assessment of Fevicol (adhesive) Drying Process through Dynamic Speckle Techniques

Biomedical Optics Laboratory, Department of Applied Physics, Indian School of Mines Dhanbad, Jharkhand-826004, India

Dynamic laser speckle (or biospeckle) analysis is a useful measurement tool to analyze micro-motion on a sample surface via temporal statistics based on a sequence of speckle images. The aim of this work was to evaluate the use of dynamic speckles as an alternative tool to monitoring Fevicol drying process. Experimental demonstration of intensity-based algorithm to monitor Fevicol drying process is reported. The experiment was explored with the technique called Inertia Moment of co-occurrence matrix. The results allowed verifying the drying process and it was possible to observe different activity stages during the drying process. Statistical Tukey test at 5% significance level allowed differentiating different stages of drying. In conclusion, speckle activity, measured by the Inertia Moment, can be used to monitor drying processes of the Fevicol.
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Keywords dynamic speckle; Inertia Moment; Fevicol; drying; activity

Citation: Mohammad Z. Ansari, Anil K. Nirala. Assessment of Fevicol (adhesive) Drying Process through Dynamic Speckle Techniques. AIMS Bioengineering, 2015, 2(2): 49-59. doi: 10.3934/bioeng.2015.2.49

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This article has been cited by

  • 1. Mohammad Z. Ansari, Anil K Nirala, Following the drying process of Fevicol (adhesive) by dynamic speckle measurement, Journal of Optics, 2015, 10.1007/s12596-015-0298-x
  • 2. R. Balamurugan, G. Rajarajan, Study of drying process of paint by dynamic speckle with B/D pixel counting technique, Optics and Lasers in Engineering, 2017, 98, 62, 10.1016/j.optlaseng.2017.06.004
  • 3. Roberto A. Braga, Rolando J. González-Peña, Accuracy in dynamic laser speckle: optimum size of speckles for temporal and frequency analyses, Optical Engineering, 2016, 55, 12, 121702, 10.1117/1.OE.55.12.121702

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Copyright Info: 2015, Mohammad Z. Ansari, et al., licensee AIMS Press. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution Licese (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0)

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