Research article

Staff views of a hospital at home model implemented in a Scottish care setting

  • Received: 12 April 2021 Accepted: 24 May 2021 Published: 09 June 2021
  • Purpose

    Demographic and financial challenges mean prioritising a shift in healthcare provision from acute to community settings. One well-evidenced model encapsulating this is ‘hospital at home’, however limited research has examined staffs' views on its implementation, which may inform service development and increase job satisfaction. The aim within was to explore the staff perspective of implementing a ‘hospital at home’ model in a Scottish care setting which can inform service provision and ultimately increase job satisfaction.

    Methods

    The ‘Acute Care @ Home’ (AC@H) service had a multi-disciplinary team. Referrals were predominantly received from a geriatric hospital ward. Inclusion criteria were older adults with geriatric syndromes and who required care input for a duration between one to seven days. In-depth staff interviews (N = 13) were conducted and analysed thematically to understand barriers and facilitators to implementation. These were supplemented with questionnaires assessing constructs of interest including training, communication and overall satisfaction.

    Results

    Several themes urged from our study: inter-team and intra-team collaboration, service development and operation, and scaling considerations. High job satisfaction was reported (mean score 73%), particularly due to a perceived non-hierarchical team structure and inclusive management style. Staff attributed positive outcomes through better identifying patients' needs at home compared to in hospital. Continuity of care facilitated rapport building. Recruitment challenges restricted the acuity and volume of patients the team were able to care for.

    Conclusions

    This qualitative methodology could be useful for future implementation of intermediate care resources for the future health and care system building. Patient assessments at home, as opposed to in hospital, in conjunction with care continuity by staff, may mitigate against hospital risks and better facilitate reablement. Where recruitment challenges are present, agile models of care delivery should be considered.

    Citation: Katherine Karacaoglu, Calum F Leask. Staff views of a hospital at home model implemented in a Scottish care setting[J]. AIMS Public Health, 2021, 8(3): 467-478. doi: 10.3934/publichealth.2021036

    Related Papers:

  • Purpose

    Demographic and financial challenges mean prioritising a shift in healthcare provision from acute to community settings. One well-evidenced model encapsulating this is ‘hospital at home’, however limited research has examined staffs' views on its implementation, which may inform service development and increase job satisfaction. The aim within was to explore the staff perspective of implementing a ‘hospital at home’ model in a Scottish care setting which can inform service provision and ultimately increase job satisfaction.

    Methods

    The ‘Acute Care @ Home’ (AC@H) service had a multi-disciplinary team. Referrals were predominantly received from a geriatric hospital ward. Inclusion criteria were older adults with geriatric syndromes and who required care input for a duration between one to seven days. In-depth staff interviews (N = 13) were conducted and analysed thematically to understand barriers and facilitators to implementation. These were supplemented with questionnaires assessing constructs of interest including training, communication and overall satisfaction.

    Results

    Several themes urged from our study: inter-team and intra-team collaboration, service development and operation, and scaling considerations. High job satisfaction was reported (mean score 73%), particularly due to a perceived non-hierarchical team structure and inclusive management style. Staff attributed positive outcomes through better identifying patients' needs at home compared to in hospital. Continuity of care facilitated rapport building. Recruitment challenges restricted the acuity and volume of patients the team were able to care for.

    Conclusions

    This qualitative methodology could be useful for future implementation of intermediate care resources for the future health and care system building. Patient assessments at home, as opposed to in hospital, in conjunction with care continuity by staff, may mitigate against hospital risks and better facilitate reablement. Where recruitment challenges are present, agile models of care delivery should be considered.


    Abbreviations

    NHS

    National Health Service

    AC@H

    Acute Care @ Home

    MDT

    Multi-disciplinary team

    GP

    General Practitioner

    ANP

    Advanced Nurse Practitioner

    PT

    Physiotherapist

    OT

    Occupational Therapist

    HCSW

    Health Care Support Worker

    PTech

    Pharmacy Technician

    TL

    Team Leader

    加载中

    Acknowledgments



    The authorship team would like to thank the interviewees for their participation in this study. The service was funded by Aberdeen City Health and Social Care Partnership's Integrated Joint Board.

    Statement of ethical approval



    As data collection fell within the parameters of service evaluation, ethical approval was not required. However, ethical standards were adhered to, including 1) informed consent secured prior to interview; 2) data treated confidentially at each stage and 3) individuals are not identifiable from results.

    Conflict of interest



    The author declares no conflicts of interest.

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