Research article

Food security and food sources linked to dietary diversity in rural smallholder farming households in central Uganda

  • Received: 19 October 2020 Accepted: 22 February 2021 Published: 25 May 2021
  • Undernourishment, low food quantity and poor dietary quality are common among smallholders in rural communities of Uganda. A cross-sectional study of rural smallholder farming households (n = 174) with children under five in Kiboga district, Uganda used a structured questionnaire to assess household food security status, frequency of household food consumption, and dietary diversity for children. Children's height and weight measurements were taken, and Z-scores calculated as indicators for nutritional status. Household typologies were created using principal component analysis. Households had adequate food supply for 7.6 ± 0.2 months a year; and a total of 35% were food secure. Over 7 days, starchy staples and legumes were consumed by all households; other food groups consumed were dark green leafy vegetables (43%), orange and dark-yellow foods (72%), and animal source foods (53%–60%). Roots, tubers, cooking bananas; vitamin A-rich vegetables, and legumes were sourced mainly from on-farm production, while animal source foods were mainly from the market. 76% of children consumed ≤3 food groups the previous day and 33% were stunted. Four household typologies were generated, 1st (29% households) and 2nd (23%) had more food secure households, 3rd (28%) had mild food insecurity and 4th (20%) had severe food insecurity. The 3rd and 4th typologies had the lowest dietary diversity. In summary, limited diversity of crops grown, low consumption of micronutrient-rich foods, child stunting, and household food insecurity were observed, while own production and markets were the main sources of food. The four household typologies can be used to develop context specific strategies to improve dietary diversity.

    Citation: Deborah Nabuuma, Beatrice Ekesa, Mieke Faber, Xikombiso Mbhenyane. Food security and food sources linked to dietary diversity in rural smallholder farming households in central Uganda[J]. AIMS Agriculture and Food, 2021, 6(2): 644-662. doi: 10.3934/agrfood.2021038

    Related Papers:

  • Undernourishment, low food quantity and poor dietary quality are common among smallholders in rural communities of Uganda. A cross-sectional study of rural smallholder farming households (n = 174) with children under five in Kiboga district, Uganda used a structured questionnaire to assess household food security status, frequency of household food consumption, and dietary diversity for children. Children's height and weight measurements were taken, and Z-scores calculated as indicators for nutritional status. Household typologies were created using principal component analysis. Households had adequate food supply for 7.6 ± 0.2 months a year; and a total of 35% were food secure. Over 7 days, starchy staples and legumes were consumed by all households; other food groups consumed were dark green leafy vegetables (43%), orange and dark-yellow foods (72%), and animal source foods (53%–60%). Roots, tubers, cooking bananas; vitamin A-rich vegetables, and legumes were sourced mainly from on-farm production, while animal source foods were mainly from the market. 76% of children consumed ≤3 food groups the previous day and 33% were stunted. Four household typologies were generated, 1st (29% households) and 2nd (23%) had more food secure households, 3rd (28%) had mild food insecurity and 4th (20%) had severe food insecurity. The 3rd and 4th typologies had the lowest dietary diversity. In summary, limited diversity of crops grown, low consumption of micronutrient-rich foods, child stunting, and household food insecurity were observed, while own production and markets were the main sources of food. The four household typologies can be used to develop context specific strategies to improve dietary diversity.



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