Research Article

The optimal mid-upper-arm circumference cutoffs to screen severe acute malnutrition in Vietnamese children

  • Received: 10 December 2019 Accepted: 17 March 2020 Published: 23 March 2020
  • Severe acute malnutrition (SAM) remains a main cause of mortality among children under five years old. Vietnam needs further study to establish the optimal mid-upper-arm circumference (MUAC) cutoff for improving the accuracy of the MUAC indicator in screening SAM children aged 6–59 months. A survey was conducted at all 16 subdistricts across four provinces in Northern Midlands and mountainous areas. The data of 4,764 children showed that an optimal MUAC cutoff of 13.5 cm would allow the inclusion of 65% of children with weight-for-height z-scores (WHZs) below −3SD. A combination of MUAC and WHZ may achieve a higher impact on therapeutic feeding programs for SAM children. The MUAC cutoff of 13.5 cm (65% sensitivity and 72% specificity) should be used as the cutoff for improving and/or preventing SAM status among children under 5 in the Midlands and mountainous areas in Vietnam.

    Citation: Tran Thi Hai, Saptawati Bardosono, Luh Ade Ari Wiradnyani, Le Thi Hop, Hoang T. Duc Ngan, Huynh Nam Phuong. The optimal mid-upper-arm circumference cutoffs to screen severe acute malnutrition in Vietnamese children[J]. AIMS Public Health, 2020, 7(1): 188-196. doi: 10.3934/publichealth.2020016

    Related Papers:

  • Severe acute malnutrition (SAM) remains a main cause of mortality among children under five years old. Vietnam needs further study to establish the optimal mid-upper-arm circumference (MUAC) cutoff for improving the accuracy of the MUAC indicator in screening SAM children aged 6–59 months. A survey was conducted at all 16 subdistricts across four provinces in Northern Midlands and mountainous areas. The data of 4,764 children showed that an optimal MUAC cutoff of 13.5 cm would allow the inclusion of 65% of children with weight-for-height z-scores (WHZs) below −3SD. A combination of MUAC and WHZ may achieve a higher impact on therapeutic feeding programs for SAM children. The MUAC cutoff of 13.5 cm (65% sensitivity and 72% specificity) should be used as the cutoff for improving and/or preventing SAM status among children under 5 in the Midlands and mountainous areas in Vietnam.
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    Acknowledgment



    This study was financially supported by the National Institute of Nutrition, Vietnam and the Deutscher Akademischer Austcuschdienst Scholarships for Developing Countries. We would also like to thank the participants for their kind and patient participation in this study.

    Conflict of interest



    The author declared no potential conflicts of interest with respect to the research, authorship, and/or publication of this article.

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    © 2020 the Author(s), licensee AIMS Press. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0)
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