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Differences in quality of life among college student electronic cigarette users

1 College of Nursing, East Tennessee State University, Johnson City, TN, USA
2 School of Medicine, University of Louisville, Louisville, KY, USA
3 Department of Communication, University of Louisville, Louisville, KY USA
4 Campus Health Services, University of Louisville, Louisville, KY USA
5 Department of Population and Public Health Sciences, Wright State University, Dayton, OH, USA

Purpose: The purpose of this study was to explore an association between e-cigarette use and Quality of Life (QOL) among college students. Methods: During February 2016, 1,132 students completed an online survey that included measures of tobacco use and the WHOQOL-BREF instrument. Differences were tested using Chi-square, Fisher’s exact test, and ANOVA, and regression was used to assess possible relationships. Results: E-cigarettes were used by 6.97% of the participants, either solo or along with traditional cigarettes. Bivariate analyses suggest that male college students are more likely than females to use e-cigarettes, either solo or in combination with traditional cigarettes (χ2 =19.4, P < .01). Lesbian, gay, and bisexual students are more likely than heterosexual students to use traditional cigarettes, either solo or in combination with e-cigarettes (χ2 = 32.9, P < .01). Multivariate models suggest that for every 10-unit increase in overall QOL, psychological well-being, social relations or environmental health the adjusted odds of being a sole cigarette user were significantly lower (all, P < .01), respectively. For every 10-unit increase in psychological well-being the adjusted odds of being a dual user was significantly lower (OR = .83, P = .026). Conclusions: Findings indicate that lower quality of life appears to be connected to tobacco use.
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© 2018 the Author(s), licensee AIMS Press. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution Licese (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0)

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