Research article

Impacts on vegetable yields, nutrient contents and soil fertility in a community garden with different compost amendments

  • Received: 03 June 2020 Accepted: 01 September 2020 Published: 21 September 2020
  • This study aimed to test impacts on soil fertility, plant yield, and plant nutrient content when growing vegetables (Arugula and Radish) at different compost treatments rates (10%, 30%, 50% and 70% v/v) and with synthetic fertilizer. The compost used in this study was produced from food wastes in combination of wood chips. The results showed the impacts on vegetable growth and soil fertility varied exceptionally by the compost amendment rate. Specifically, the leafy crop experienced an increased yield with the incremented compost ratio and therefore the highest treatment (70%) generated a harvest several times larger to that of non-treated soil. For the root vegetable, the largest output was observed at a medium treatment rate (50%). Additionally, the applications revealed compost treatments at high percentages generally promoted elements N, P, K, Na, Mn, Zn and Mg within the vegetable contents. On the contrary, a low compost amount (10%) boosted Ca, Al, and Fe levels. In terms of soil fertility enrichment, the compost can improve C, N, K and Zn at medium to high treatment rates (30% to 70%). Particularly, at such amounts, the compost enhanced C and N contents within the ground soil more than the fertilizer application. Based on the gathered outcomes, root vegetables will thrive at 50% compost treatment allowing for the replacement of complete synthetic fertilizer use without significant reduction on yields and nutrients. As for leafy green vegetables, the 70 % compost concentration permits the replacement of more than half the total fertilizer usage.

    Citation: Dongyan Mu, John Hawks, Andrew Diaz. Impacts on vegetable yields, nutrient contents and soil fertility in a community garden with different compost amendments[J]. AIMS Environmental Science, 2020, 7(4): 350-365. doi: 10.3934/environsci.2020023

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  • This study aimed to test impacts on soil fertility, plant yield, and plant nutrient content when growing vegetables (Arugula and Radish) at different compost treatments rates (10%, 30%, 50% and 70% v/v) and with synthetic fertilizer. The compost used in this study was produced from food wastes in combination of wood chips. The results showed the impacts on vegetable growth and soil fertility varied exceptionally by the compost amendment rate. Specifically, the leafy crop experienced an increased yield with the incremented compost ratio and therefore the highest treatment (70%) generated a harvest several times larger to that of non-treated soil. For the root vegetable, the largest output was observed at a medium treatment rate (50%). Additionally, the applications revealed compost treatments at high percentages generally promoted elements N, P, K, Na, Mn, Zn and Mg within the vegetable contents. On the contrary, a low compost amount (10%) boosted Ca, Al, and Fe levels. In terms of soil fertility enrichment, the compost can improve C, N, K and Zn at medium to high treatment rates (30% to 70%). Particularly, at such amounts, the compost enhanced C and N contents within the ground soil more than the fertilizer application. Based on the gathered outcomes, root vegetables will thrive at 50% compost treatment allowing for the replacement of complete synthetic fertilizer use without significant reduction on yields and nutrients. As for leafy green vegetables, the 70 % compost concentration permits the replacement of more than half the total fertilizer usage.


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