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Molecular pathway network of EFNA1 in cancer and mesenchymal stem cells

1 Division of Risk Assessment, Biological Safety Research Center, National Institute of Health Sciences, Kawasaki, Japan
2 Department of Clinical Genomics, National Cancer Center Research Institute, Tokyo, Japan
3 Department of Pathology, Kobe University of Graduate School of Medicine, Kobe, Japan
4 Department of Translational Oncology, National Cancer Center Research Institute, Tokyo, Japan

Abundant molecules are dynamically activated in cancer and stem cells. To investigate the role of ephrin A1 (EFNA1) in cancer and stem cell signaling pathways, we analyzed the gene expression and molecular network of EFNA1 in mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) and diffuse-type gastric cancer (GC). Diffuse-type GC has more mesenchymal-like feature and malignant characteristics compared to intestinal-type GC. The signaling and molecular network of EFNA1 in cancer and stem cells were analyzed using several databases, including cBioPortal for Cancer Genomics, Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG). The gene expression of EFNA1 was up-regulated in diffuse-type GC compared to MSCs. The molecular pathway network of EFNA1 includes cadherin 1 (CDH1), catenin beta 1 (CTNNB1), ras-related C3 botulinum toxin substrate 1 (rho family, small GTP binding protein Rac1) (RAC1), EPH receptor A5 (EPHA5), and the KRAS proto-oncogene, GTPase (KRAS). We summarized molecular pathway network of EFNA1 in cancer and stem cells. The results revealed a network model for EFNA1 in cancer and stem cells.
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Keywords epithelial-mesenchymal transition; gastric cancer; gene expression; mesenchymal stem cell; EFNA1; signaling pathway

Citation: Shihori Tanabe, Kazuhiko Aoyagi, Hiroshi Yokozaki, Hiroki Sasaki. Molecular pathway network of EFNA1 in cancer and mesenchymal stem cells. AIMS Cell and Tissue Engineering, 2018, 2(2): 58-77. doi: 10.3934/celltissue.2018.2.58

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